RETRO RANCH EXTERIOR

 

 

Aluminum siding ad from a 1960 Canadian Homes magazine.

Aluminum siding ad from a 1960 Canadian Homes magazine.

 

When we first planned on moving and renovating the house we didn’t realize that the bricks would need to be removed prior to the house being relocated. Bricks obviously add a lot of weight to the house and can crack during the moving process so although it’s been done, it’s easiest and safest to remove them. After a few weeks of hard work, my husband along with some great help have successfully debricked the house. As you can see below, the brick was a neutral mix of red, oranges and black which I quite liked but I am looking forward to giving the home’s exterior a makeover.

The bricks partially off.

The bricks partially off.

I like the idea of keeping it neutral with a medium to dark shade of grey (a neutral grey with no blue or green undertones) board and batten siding with a mix of stacked brick around the doorway and window section of the front, a look that was popular for mid-century ranchers. The house is quite long so having just board and batten siding would be pretty boring. The stone will give it some depth and separation and make it much more visually appealing. Below is a sketch of what I’ve got in mind.

Sketch of possible house exterior.

Sketch of possible house exterior.

Grey siding may not be the most daring colour of siding, unlike the turquoise and pink pastel siding popular in the 50s and 60s, but I think it will be the perfect shade for our house to really make the door pop…which I would love to paint in a lemon lime colour. Some landscaping in the front will also add some colour and interest. Here are our possible colour choices so far.

Our house exterior colour choices so far.

Our house exterior colour choices so far.

Finding a neutral grey has been quite a challenge. I have yet to find the perfect grey that doesn’t have a blue, green or mauve tint – any suggestions? I have to get some samples of grey siding but I’d like to have a paint sample to bring along. I like the one on the above left (Dulux Paint ‘Grimmy’s Grey’ but I’m not sure if it is too dark.)The lighter grey (Dulux Paint ‘Granite Grey’) is probably too light but it might work for an interior colour. The door colour looks extremely bold here and is a little more subdued in real life – it is Rona Collection paint ‘Chartreuse’. The stone above is ‘Slate Grey’ from a company called Canyon Stone Canada. They offer lots of stone options. We are thinking of using their Quick Fit series which is manufactured 4″ high panels in varied lengths of 8, 12 and 18 inches. I like the colour above because it has various shades of grey as well as a mix of tan which will warm up the grey a bit and blend in with the door colour if I end up going with the lemon lime or an orange colour. The two other possible stone colours I like are below. On the left is ‘Dark Ember’ which has more grey and less tan, ‘Slate Grey’ is in the middle and ‘Platinum’ on the right side which is quite a bit lighter…maybe too light. We have to go see the samples in person before making a decision.

Dark Ember, Slate Grey, Platinum - stacked stone from Canyon Stone Canada.

Dark Ember, Slate Grey, Platinum – stacked stone from Canyon Stone Canada.

 

And for fun, check out these ads from the early 1960s for all the pretty pastel siding that was all the rage back then. I love the turquoise although I’m not sure I would ever be brave enough to do a whole house in it.

 

Retro siding ad.

1960s siding ad – coral must have been a popular shade.

 

retro siding

Lovely pastel shades in a retro siding ad.

 

Aluminum siding ad from 1960 Canadian Homes magazine.

Aluminum siding ad from 1960 Canadian Homes magazine.

 

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