ORDER KITCHEN CABINETS ☑

The finalized kitchen plan.

The finalized kitchen plan.

After a bit of indecision we did go ahead and order the kitchen from Home Depot. We liked the cabinets (Thomasville gloss white thermofoil), the kitchen design and the service from Shirley, our kitchen designer…and we were able to take advantage of a $1600 savings so the price was right. The cabinets will be just under $10,000 installed.

Finalized kitchen plan.

Finalized kitchen plan.

 

Window wall of finalized kitchen.

Window wall of finalized kitchen.

The kitchen plan did have to be altered again a bit once we had their installer do exact measurements. You can see the previous plan below to compare. The window wall didn’t have quite the space we thought once the window and patio door trim, etc. was taken into consideration. So now we have five upper cabinets instead of six. She wanted to keep all of the upper cabinets the same width and made the two cabinets beside the window open on opposite sides to give it more symmetry. I also lost my little corner shelf by the window which I thought was a charming addition but I’ll get over it…I’m telling myself it would have just been a dust collector anyway.

The previous kitchen plan.

The previous kitchen plan.

And I am still dreaming about these robin’s egg blue Elmira appliances. They would look so beautiful with the white cabinets…I love them.

Elmira Stove Works appliances in Robin's Egg Blue.

Elmira Stove Works appliances in Robin’s Egg Blue.

Unfortunately, they are not cheap so I will probably end up having to go with stainless. I was also considering white appliances but someone mentioned that the white of the cabinets may not be the same as the white of white appliances which makes sense, so white is no longer an option.

So now that the kitchen is on order I can’t wait until we are ready to install the kitchen. There is lots of work to do before the kitchen cabinets can be installed since currently the kitchen and dining room is down to 2x4s…not to mention the house is sitting on blocks until spring comes and warms up the frozen ground enough to dig a foundation and pour a basement. All of the interior work is on hold until then so I am hoping for an early spring.

While we wait there are plenty of design and decorating decisions we’re still working on like hardware, flooring, counter top, appliances, lighting and that’s just the list for the kitchen.

 

 

KITCHEN UPDATE…FLOORING AND HARDWARE

Vintage Younstown Steel kitchen.

A vintage Youngstown Steel kitchen ad with the look I am going for. Simple white cabinet doors with boomerang chrome hardware and chrome edging on a countertop that stands out.

We are almost ready to order our kitchen cabinets. We are just taking a day or two to make sure we are comfortable with the cabinet placement and of course, the cost. We also revisited the house renovation budget we’d created when we started this whole process and were reminded that since we originally had planned to just paint the existing cabinets and get new hardware, our kitchen cabinet budget was a mere $2000, plus new appliances. With some help from Shirley, our friendly kitchen designer, we were able to bring the new kitchen cabinet costs to just below $10,000 including installation. I’m confident that we will end up with a great kitchen that we love. We met with her again this week and got the revised kitchen plan you see below. The cabinets will be Thomasville glossy white thermofoil (although they look a bit grey in the plan)… the countertops will not be orange. I am still looking for the right countertop and have recently ordered some larger samples from Formica, Arborite and Wilsonart so I can see them in person so I’ll update countertop and backsplash options once I get them.

Revised kitchen plan.

The most recent updated kitchen plan.

The original kitchen plan.

The original kitchen plan.

We made a few adjustments from the original kitchen plan. We are holding off on the large pantry cupboards on the left side wall for now to save a little money and we were concerned that they might be in the way physically and visibly with the entrance door being at that side. Also, we realized that our kitchen window is larger than we had entered in the original plan so to adjust, we had to replace the cabinet to the left of the window with a small diagonal shelf (perfect for displaying some of my vintage chachkas). The cabinets to the right of the window were extended a little so they could all still be the same width and the uppers are now just going to have regular doors rather than doors that lift up. And we felt that with the style of the kitchen, it looked better without the crown moulding. I am happy with all of the changes that have been made and I’m feeling pretty good. Of course I looked at reviews for Thomasville and Home Depot kitchens which had both very positive and some very negative reviews. Reviews can be helpful but I sometimes think that with the usual mix of good and bad comments they can actually make you more confused with what to choose. Personally, I have been very happy with Home Depot’s service so far and our kitchen designer has been helpful, friendly and informative with great input and has been in no way pushy. So I guess it comes down to the product and installation. I’ll let you know my thoughts on that once we have our kitchen installed in a few months.

We won’t be able to install the kitchen until late spring once the house is put onto the foundation. And the foundation and basement can’t be poured until the weather cooperates…and the 35cm of snow we just got likely won’t be going anywhere soon with the record cold temperatures. That frustrates me a little but weather is one thing that is out of our control so I have decided not to worry. I know everything will come together when it is supposed to. And the extra time allows me to take time to decide on everything like counter tops and flooring.

I am still thinking of putting in linoleum flooring in the kitchen and dining room, and possibly the entry way and living room. I like the linoleum option because it is made mostly of natural materials (linseed oil, cork, jute and natural resins). Here are a few possibilities:

This is a grey called ‘light showers’ linoleum from Armstrong.

Armstrong Light Showers linoleum.

Armstrong Light Showers linoleum.

I do still like the original flooring I had picked a few weeks ago as it has more of a vintage flooring look to it and it has a nice blend of colours however I am worried it may be a little light in colour so wouldn’t hide dirt as well. It is Azrock’s Raw Silk.

Azrock vinyl in Raw Silk SKU V-280 www.azrock.com

Azrock vinyl in Raw Silk SKU V-280 www.azrock.com

I also really like Armstrong’s striations line of bio Based tile. The colour Twilight (below) is a nice mix of dark greys along with a hint of turquoise, which isn’t really too obvious looking at the sample photo. The colours would definitely work in the space.

Armstrong BioBased tile in Twilight Striations.

Armstrong tile in Twilight Striations.

It also comes in a pretty aqua shade that could work for an accent inset somewhere.

Armstrong BioBased tile in Azure striations.

Armstrong tile in Azure striations.

And I just ordered several samples of Marmoleum from Forbo.com. They have some really great grey tone options. I like this Grey Dusk with two toned speckled look:

Marmoleum Grey Dusk 3607 from Forbo.com.

Marmoleum Grey Dusk 3607 from Forbo.com.

 

and this is Comet from their concrete look line:

Marmoleum Comet 3703 Forbo.com.

Marmoleum Comet 3703 Forbo.com.

And this Grey Granite from their Striato line:

Grey Granite from Marboleum Striato line, Forbo.com.

Grey Granite from Marmoleum Striato line, Forbo.com.

I’ll see what I think of them in person when I get the samples.

I have also been checking out hardware options. I have found a few vintage lots of original mid century chrome hardware on Etsy.com which might be an option although a few I really like don’t have enough in the lot and some have rust or dents. If I order new hardware I am still really leaning towards the Boomerang Drawer Pulls from Rejuvenation:

Rejuvenation Boomerang Drawer Pull in polished chrome.

Rejuvenation Boomerang Drawer Pull in polished chrome.

And simple polished chrome round knobs for the cabinet doors, the ones shown are also from Rejuvenation but I’m hoping I can get something similar for a little less somewhere else.

Round Dish Cabinet Knob from Rejuvenation.

Round Dish Cabinet Knob from Rejuvenation.

The boomerang style was in many 1950s kitchens. Similar styles below were offered in a 1965 Beaver Lumber flyer.

Vintage hardware options from a 1965 flyer.

Vintage hardware options from a 1965 flyer.

Back in 1965 you could get the lovely polished chrome boomerang style cabinet pulls (#22 in the above ad) for only 40 cents each and the same style of boomerang pull today from Rejuvenation is $11 each.

Another style of pull I have always loved are these chrome deco door pulls. Our century home has two sets of these on the original built in closet doors in our front room that was once the parlour. I would like to take them to use somewhere in the new place but at the same time I think they should stay where they were installed several decades ago.

Vintage cabinet pulls.

Original art deco style cabinet pulls from a built in cabinet in our 100 year old home.

You can get reproductions of this style at Rejuvenation as well although definitely not as nice as the originals I have to say.

Déco drawer pulls from Rejuvenation.

Déco drawer pulls from Rejuvenation.

I’ll keep you posted on what we end up choosing.

 

 

LIGHTEN UP

Vintage light illustration from a vintage book 'Your Own Room', 1960.

Vintage light illustration from a vintage book ‘Your Own Room’, 1960.

Pendants and lamps from the 1950s and 1960s were often more like pieces of art or sculpture that added much more than just light to a room. Rooms wouldn’t just have a single light on the ceiling in the center of a room, there would also be cool lamps sometimes built into side table and colourful pendant lights hung over chairs or desks in corners of a room often in a cluster like in the photo below.

Example of accent lighting in a mid century room, photo from 1965 book Interior Decoration by Betty Pepis.

Example of accent lighting in a mid century room, photo from 1965 book Interior Decoration by Betty Pepis.

You can still find a great selection of original mid century lighting in antique shops and online on sites like Etsy and Ebay but unfortunately most of the amazing lights I would love to have for the new place are out of my budget (although well worth the money if I had it.) I did manage to pick up this lovely pendant light a few years ago at a barn sale. It has rounded wood sides over a white globe light – I’m thinking it’s teak but I can’t say for sure. The base and hardware were spray painted silver by the previous owner but were originally brass which is visible in spots. I’ve had it in storage because it wouldn’t have looked right in my current home. I am very excited to finally have a place to hang it. I am envisioning it above my vintage tulip table in the dining room. The wood matches nicely with my fifties teak stereo credenza that will also end up the dining room.

 

mid century pendant light.

mid century pendant light.

I also had a 1960s pole lamp given to me a few years ago that is stashed somewhere in the basement that will finally come out of storage and a few spaghetti lamps (I just can’t pass up a spaghetti lamp) that will also have a place in the new house.

My turquoise spaghetti lamp.

My turquoise spaghetti lamp.

 

We got some 1960s lighting catalogues in the pile of house stuff we acquired from the previous owners which has some beautiful examples of mid century lighting. The house we are renovating had rather plain lighting so we will be replacing most of the lights with new vintage lighting, possibly with some of the styles below.

 

Mid century lighting  from Virden Lighting.

Mid century lighting from Virden Lighting.

These pretty pendants could have a place anywhere in the home. The ad reads ‘dramatic in any room…entrance hall…corner of living room…in a row over planter, breakfast bar or buffet…in a cluster over dining table or coffee table…flanking a mirror in the bathroom, bed or dresser in a bedroom.’

Mid century pendant lighting  from Virden Lighting.

Mid century pendant lighting from Virden Lighting.

I love the cluster of three hanging from the walnut spreader. I would love to find a light like that in my budget.

 

Vintage bullet wall sconces from Virden Lighting.

Vintage bullet wall sconces from Virden Lighting.

How stylish are these classic mid century bullet sconces. They would look great in a hallway or bedroom.

 

Vintage globe lights from Virden Lighting.

Vintage globe lights from Virden Lighting.

My parents had a similar round globe light in our hallway growing up. I have always liked the simplicity of these. I picked a small one up recently that I’m hoping to put in our front entrance. This classic style of light is still available – I saw them not too long ago at Rona, Home & Garden store and they can likely be found at other big box and lighting stores.

Vintage pulldown lights from Virden.

Vintage pulldown lights from Virden.

I see these pull down lights in vintage magazines and advertisements often. They were obviously a popular style. Both stylish and functional, they could be left closer to the ceiling or could be pulled down closer to eye level. They would work great above a desk in a common living area like in the room below. I also love the colourful cluster pendant in this room…and the curtains…and the painting…the planter…the chairs – I would like one of everything please.

Lovely bright colourful room, from 1965 book, Interior Decoration A-Z by Betty Pepis.

Lovely bright colourful room, from 1965 book, Interior Decoration A-Z by Betty Pepis.

And for a more 60s mod look check out these Scandinavian style fixtures that you ordered and made yourself. Each kit contained polystyrol shade components, wire, fittings and instructions. Kits were $12.99 – $18.99.

 

Make your own fixtures, from an early 1970s Eaton's catalogue.

Make your own fixtures, from an early 1970s Eaton’s catalogue.

I know I’ll be adding to this post when I find more lighting for our house. There is so many beautiful vintage lights out there just waiting to add light and character to a room once again.

 

 

 

 

 

WALL COVERING – PANELLING

 

Panelling ad.

Panelling ad.

Ahh, panelling. The ever so popular wall covering that ended up in every household in the fifties through the seventies. It was used in basements, rec rooms, family rooms and any other room in the house. I understand why it was such a popular option. It could easily cover up imperfect walls, was reasonably priced, came in countless shades, was very low maintenance, durable and simple to install.

Panelling was easy to install...much simpler than plaster or drywall.

Panelling was easy to install…much simpler than plaster or drywall.

I actually don’t mind the look of panelling for a rec room or basement area but for me, most of it is too dark for a living room, dining room or bedroom. The panelling in the living room of the house we are currently living in was so dark when I moved in so we painted over it. The only panelling in the 1960s house we’re renovating is in the back entry/laundry room. The rest of the rooms are plaster or wallpapered.

Our home growing up (built in 1974) was filled with panelling of all shades. To refresh my memory I flipped through my old childhood photo album – we had more panelling than I remembered. There was a classic rich wood panelling in the dining room, the rec room and the three bedrooms, a light blonde knotty pine panelling in the den and a dark charcoal panelling with a silvery grain in the living room that contrasted nicely with the multicolour shag style carpeting and orange damask fiberglass curtains. My siblings might not appreciate me posting this photo but it was the best one I could find for showing the unique silvery grey panelling in the living room I remember so fondly (aren’t we stylin.) Like many homeowners, my parents renovated their home in the nineties and tore out all of the old panelling (along with the shag carpet) and replaced it with wallpaper and paint.

Our living room panelling growing up.

Our living room panelling growing up.

Here are a few old ads for panelling.

Vintage panelling ad.

Vintage panelling ad.

panelling

Ad for Weldwood wood paneling, 1959

 

 

1959 ad for Weldwood paneling.

1959 ad for Weldwood paneling.

 

living room panelling.

living room panelling from Abitibi.

 

Panelling worked well for toy and rec rooms.

Panelling worked well for toy and rec rooms.

 

1961 DIY – DECORATIVE LINOLEUM INSETS

DIY linoleum insets from Dominion Flooring, from a 1961 Canadian Homes magazine.

DIY linoleum insets from Dominion Flooring, from a 1961 Canadian Homes magazine.

These fun and creative linoleum insets were created by Dominion Linoleum’s ‘décor-conscious designers’ as a DIY flooring tile inset back in 1961. People could send for free cutting guide templates and full instructions. Then they could add their own unique inset tiles to their floors. What a neat idea. These designs are giving me some creative inspiration for a home décor project…stay tuned!

Check out more vintage flooring ads here http://modranchreno.com/2015/01/floors-before-fifties-flooring/

Dominion Linoleum ad, 1961.

Dominion Linoleum ad, 1961.

Linoleum inset designs.

Linoleum inset designs.

 

**In case you’re interested, Dominion Oilcloth & Linoleum Company was a Canadian flooring company based in Montreal that was founded in 1872 but is unfortunately no longer around.**